Scott Stropkay, Patience, 2023, oil on canvas, 28x42; Wiley Holton, Needing, 2023, acrylic and colored pencil on wood, 16x16

Scott Stropkay

I am an artist and designer. My artwork is primarily figurative to invite the viewer to think about the people depicted and wonder about their stories. I hope to engage viewers with question or in a memory that inspires a level of self-reflection and connection to others.

I believe individuals and societies can use art to better understand themselves. Art, design, and creative thinking are among the most important tools we can use to engage people both emotionally and functionally in self-reflection and change-making.

“Living Canvas” – the Art of Scott Stropkay

Wiley Holton + Scott Stropkay

Exhibition Reception Date:

May 16, 5:30pm

Exhibition Opening:

May 2

Exhibition End Date:

June 2

Exhibition Year:

2024

Wiley Holton
www.wileyholton.com
wileyholton@artbywiley.com

Wiley Holton’s kaleidoscope paintings articulate the chaos, anxiety, and depression that stem
from her ADHD and, in depicting how her brain feels and functions, challenge the misconceptions that people attach to this neurological disorder and mental illnesses in general. When randomly starting new centers of the kaleidoscope, Wiley intentionally breaks the ordered geometric pattern she has so meticulously created, provoking the viewer to question what they are seeing and not seeing amongst the smudged lines. Each piece explores contrast between the background and the lines themselves, demonstrating a complexity of vision, emotion, and experience. Her style continues to evolve with her evolving understanding of herself. Beginning with the addition of filling in the shapes of the kaleidoscopes with color in her Emergent Series, she explores the concept of finding peace amongst the chaos, of art as remedy. Her Horizon Lines style, which breaks down nature into its core colors and explores the vast range of hues between them, marks a continued study of meditation, even nostalgia. In her newest series, “Motion,” she aims to bridge the abstract with the familiar as she combines both of her usual styles, mixing the innate connotations of colors with the geometry of her world. Her work is in numerous private collections across the country.